Project Benefits

Subsidence is a real issue in our part of the state – Harris, Galveston, and Fort Bend counties have experienced sinking by several feet due to groundwater withdrawals. Excessive groundwater pumping is said to be the single largest cause of subsidence. Subsidence is the cause of much of our flooding problems. For that reason, regulations have been put in place to limit the use of groundwater. By 2025, surface water must supply at least 60 percent of our water, and 80 percent by 2035.

The Northeast Water Purification Plant expansion is a pivotal part of this conversion from groundwater to surface water. This plant treats Lake Houston water and turns it into drinking water for parts of Harris and Fort Bend counties and surrounding areas. The additional demand for surface water will be offset by the Luce Bayou Interbasin Transfer Project drawing water from the Trinity River and transferring it into Lake Houston. This network of surface water transfers allows the additional demands for water to be met without the use of groundwater.

 

 

Groundwater

Groundwater is a vital resource

Conservation of groundwater is important in order to avoid increased subsidence in our area. Subsidence leads to flooding as well as property damage. Many organizations have joined the fight to conserve groundwater. In addition, regulations have been put in place to limit the use of groundwater. By 2025, surface water must supply at least 60 percent of our water, and 80 percent by 2035. The Northeast Water Purification Plant expansion is a pivotal part of this conversion from groundwater to surface water.

 

 

Surface Water

By 2025, surface water must supply at least 60% of our water, and 80% by 2035

The Northeast Water Purification Plant expansion is a pivotal part of this conversion from groundwater to surface water. The Northeast Water Purification Plant treats Lake Houston water and turns it into drinking water for parts of Harris and Fort Bend counties and surrounding areas. The Luce Bayou Interbasin Transfer Project supplements Lake Houston with water from the Trinity River. This network of surface water helps meet the additional demands for water in our area.

 

 

New Technologies

The expansion will include conventional treatment processes like the existing plant that help coagulate, settle, filter, and then disinfect the water to a quality that exceeds requirements set forth by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality. In addition, an advanced oxidation process called ozonation will be constructed. Ozonation is a very powerful process for disinfecting water to help ensure that harmful organisms such as Giardia and Cryptosporidium are eliminated. Ozonation also helps eliminate taste and odor causing compounds, which improves the aesthetic quality of the water supplied by the plant.